Integrated Design - AIA COTE Competition


CU Boulder - Spring 2016


Team:

    Brian Aller
-  Integrated Building Designer
    Tyler McIntosh
-  Integrated Building Designer
    Jesse Patzer-Coletta
-  integrated Design Engineer

Skills Built:

    ★★★★★  Collaboration
    ★★★★★  Teaching
    ★★★★★  Communication
    ★★★★☆  Innovative Systems
    ★★★★☆  Energy Analysis
    ★★★★☆  AutoCAD
    ★★★☆☆  SketchUp
https://sites.google.com/site/jessecoletta2016/Engineering/integrated-design/SexyRender.png?attredirects=0
Final Presentation Render



CU Boulder once developed teams which won the international Solar Decathlon competition--the first two competitions, in fact. That was in 2002, and 2005; CU has since not competed. Our program has begun an intensive design course that is built to replicate the Solar Decathlon. This course was in its first stages this semester. I, and a group of other engineers, have taken this course which teams us up with Architecture students. We then work together to tackle a project similar to that of the Decathlon. In this case that project is hosted by the AIA. The competition is their student Committee on the Environment (COTE) competition. 

Our task is to design a home that can be used as work-force housing in the mountainous area of Silverthorne, Colorado. This housing is to be sustainable, inexpensive, and innovative. In conjunction with the Integrated Building Designers, we have developed Backbone Home.


Backbone Home centers architecturally around the "spine wall" which runs the length of the home. The wall not only anchors the home architecturally, but also anchors it structurally, and thermally

The large wall acts as a thermal mass which, in conjunction with fireplaces along the length of the home, decreases the need for mechanical heating in this heating dominated climate

Daylighting and orientation were imperative to this design. This is because not only did we want to take advantage of solar gains, but we wanted to ensure user comfort, as this space is their home. Daylighting techniques such as getting morning light into bedrooms and bathrooms, shading direct sun light in common, relaxed spaces, and overhangs to allow for gains in the winter but not summer were implemented. 



Initial SketchUp Model

Site Render and Section
https://sites.google.com/site/jessecoletta2016/Engineering/integrated-design/Site.png?attredirects=0

Interior Winter and Summer Renders
https://sites.google.com/site/jessecoletta2016/Engineering/integrated-design/Winter-LivingRoomSmall.png?attredirects=0
https://sites.google.com/site/jessecoletta2016/Engineering/integrated-design/Summer-LivingRoomSmall.png?attredirects=0